Administrative Law Matters

Commentary on developments in administrative law, particularly judicial review of administrative action by common law courts.

From Blogger

Due Process and Drone Strikes

Last week, the New York Times published a lengthy article on the ‘secret kill list’ being maintained by President Obama. Whatever the merits of targeted killings as a matter of international law, international human rights law, or justice, for students of administrative law, there are at least three aspects of interest to the story. To […] Read more

From Blogger

Environmental Reform in Canada

The federal government’s use of an omnibus budget bill to enact measures affecting a variety of different areas has come under sustained attack(you can also listen to the comments of my colleague, Stéphane Beaulac, from the three-minute mark here). Whatever one thinks about the substance of the underlying reforms, one can certainly quibble about the […] Read more

From Blogger

Administrative Policies Must be Reasonable

Administrative agencies are generally entitled to develop policies. Doing so assists agencies in discharging their statutory mandates in a coherent and consistent manner. Those who come into contact with agencies also benefit: it ought to be easier to predict the application of a general rule than the exercise of discretion. From the Court of Appeal […] Read more

From Blogger

Metzger on Administrative Common Law

Professor Gillian Metzger has an excellent paper on a topic comparatively neglected by American administrative law scholars: the common law nature of judicial review doctrine. The abstract: This article begins with the descriptive claim that much of administrative law is really administrative common law: doctrines and requirements that are largely judicially created, as opposed to […] Read more