jurisdictional error


Rebottling Old Wine

A challenge for lawyers is to fit new concepts to old language. Law is in a constant state of flux, adapting always to new realities. Sometimes, however, doctrines change rapidly and without courts considering the knock-on effects on other doctrines. The problem of tribunal reconsiderations of their decisions is an example. Say tribunals may reopen […] Read more

From Blogger

You Don’t Have the Power: Securities Investigations in Québec

In the context of an ongoing investigation of the embattled engineering firm, SNC-Lavalin, Québec’s securities regulator compelled an executive to produce certain documents. In the same letter, however, the regulator purported to prevent the executive from telling anyone else about the documents (apart from the company’s lawyers). Revealing the existence of an ongoing investigation was […] Read more

From Blogger

Medical Marijuana and Fettering Discretion

One of the cardinal principles of administrative law is that a decision-maker should never fetter his or her discretion. A recent case involving a claim for reimbursement for medical marijuana illustrates the principle nicely: Heilman v The Workers’ Compensation Board, 2012 SKQB 361.A battery of pharmaceutical treatments were prescribed over the years for the applicant’s […] Read more

From Blogger

Curial Deference, Irish style

Karole Cuddihy passes along an interesting Irish High Court decision. In the following passage, from EMI Records (Ireland) Ltd. v. The Data Protection Commissioner, [2012] IEHC 264, the ever-reliable Charleton J. describes the place of deference in Irish law. I think it also functions as a serviceable description of prevailing English law: 5.0 Only in […] Read more

From Blogger

Administrative Policies Must be Reasonable

Administrative agencies are generally entitled to develop policies. Doing so assists agencies in discharging their statutory mandates in a coherent and consistent manner. Those who come into contact with agencies also benefit: it ought to be easier to predict the application of a general rule than the exercise of discretion. From the Court of Appeal […] Read more